cut_t_wires_banner.gif
Google Search
21735010 Visitors
 HOME
 Obituaries 11-20
 Yahoo Comic Strips
 Daily Crossword
 Today's Trivia
 Daily Horoscopes
GAMES
 ARCADE
 Sheepish
 Shootem In
 Master Solitaire
 Trap Shooter
 Crypt Raider
 Pharaoh's Tomb
 HANGAROO
Area Towns
 EMERGENCY #s
 Berryville
 Eureka Springs
 Green Forest
 Holiday Island
Local Schools
 Berryville
 Clear Spring
 Eureka Springs
 Green Forest
Nat/Int News
 Top Stories
 World
 Business
 Sports
 Entertainment
 Health
 Politics
 Technology
 Science
 Opin/Editorial
 Oddly Enough

11-08   Print  E-mail
Results 1 - 1 of 2
On November 8, 1861, U.S. Navy Captain Charles Wilkes commanded the crew of the U.S.S. San Jacinto to stop the British steamer Trent and arrest Confederate diplomats James M. Mason and John Slidell. En route to Europe to rally support for the Confederate cause, the men were brought ashore and imprisoned at Fort Warren in Boston Harbor. The seizure of Mason and Slidell sparked an international controversy that brought the United States to the brink of war with Great Britain. Claiming violation of international law, Britain demanded release of the diplomats and ordered troops to Canada to prepare for a potential Anglo-American conflict. To avoid a clash, Secretary of State William H. Seward apologized for the incident. The diplomats were released in early January 1862, bringing the "Trent Affair" to a peaceful close. Captain Wilkes's naval career continued, but only briefly. In 1864, the officer was court-martialed for insubordination and conduct unbecoming an officer. Found guilty, Wilkes was publicly reprimanded and suspended for three years. Later, the sentence was reduced to one year, and in 1866 the captain was commissioned a rear admiral, retired.

The Trent Affair and his court-martial often overshadow Wilkes's early accomplishments as an explorer. From 1838 to 1842, Charles Wilkes commanded the U.S. Surveying and Exploration Expedition. The expedition traveled to the Antarctic Ocean and Antarctic barrier where Wilkes reported previously undocumented land. Credited as the first to cite Antarctica as a separate continent, Wilkes's worldwide expedition included tours of the South Pacific and the West Coast of the United States.

Learn more:


 

 INSURANCE
Browser Prefs
Add to Favorites
Make Home Page
Arcade Hi Scores
Snake:
15000
By: I DID NOT CHEAT
Tetris:
2147483647
By: PLAYED BY MASTER
Asteroids:
2147483647
By: WORLD RECORD
Invaders:
2147483647
By: YOU DID HACK IT
Pacman:
200000
By: GAME OVER
ABC News
 World News
 U.S. News
 Politics
 MONEYScope
 SciTech
 Entertainment
 Travel
 Health
 Relationships
 GMA
 Nightline
 Primetime
 20/20
 WNT

NWADN.com disclaims all liability or responsibility for any loss or damage that may result from the action or
failure to act or not act by any person in regards to any information provided within this website.