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Fri, 19 Jul 2019 16:31
Yahoo News - Latest News &Headlines
Trump takes shots at NASA administrator during photo op celebrating Apollo moon landingDuring an Oval Office photo op to commemorate Apollo 11 astronauts Buzz Aldrin and Michael Collins, President Trump dug at NASA chief Jim Bridenstine.
Trump takes shots at NASA administrator during photo op celebrating Apollo moon landing
Spacesuits have been bulky since before Apollo 11. A skintight design may change thatThe iconic, but bulky, spacesuit worn by Neil Armstrong hasn't drastically changed in decades. A skintight design may change that.
Spacesuits have been bulky since before Apollo 11. A skintight design may change that
Apollo 11 astronaut Buzz Aldrin complains about current U.S. lunar abilityWhen President Donald Trump asked Buzz Aldrin, the second human ever to walk on the moon, what he thought about the United States' current ability to operate in space 50 years after the Apollo 11 mission, the ex-astronaut had a ready response. "Actually, I've been a little disappointed over the last 10 or 15 years," Aldrin told Trump on Friday. With the 50th anniversary of the first moon landing being celebrated this week, Trump brought into the Oval Office the surviving astronauts from that mission, Aldrin and Michael Collins, and relatives of the late Neil Armstrong, the first man to walk on the moon.
Apollo 11 astronaut Buzz Aldrin complains about current U.S. lunar ability
Sanders supports protesters as telescope standoff continuesHundreds of protesters trying to stop the construction of a giant telescope on land some consider sacred continue to gather at the base of Hawaii's tallest mountain on Friday, as Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders expressed his support for the demonstration. Protest leader Kaho'okahi Kanuha said protesters have been bracing for law enforcement to show up in force ever since Gov. David Ige signed an emergency proclamation Wednesday giving authorities more control over access to the Big Island mountain. Bernie Sanders tweeted his endorsement.
Sanders supports protesters as telescope standoff continues
Trump pits Apollo 11 astronauts against NASA chiefPresident Donald Trump welcomed surviving Apollo 11 crew members Buzz Aldrin and Michael Collins to the White House Friday, using the occasion to tell his space chief he would prefer to go straight to Mars without returning to the Moon. It is a theme he had touched upon earlier this month in a tweet, and this time drew on the support of the two former astronauts, who are taking part in celebrations marking the 50th anniversary of their mission, to make his case to NASA administrator Jim Bridenstine. "To get to Mars, you have to land on the Moon, they say," said Trump, without looking convinced.
Trump pits Apollo 11 astronauts against NASA chief
Netflix’s Tight-Lipped Culture Makes Surprises Hard to Avoid(Bloomberg) -- Netflix Inc.’s biggest earnings surprise in years sent the shares plummeting the day after results were released, leaving analysts and investors wondering why they were caught so off guard.When some companies know that their quarterly results are going to fall short of forecasts, they put out a pre-announcement or update their guidance. But not Netflix.Instead, the company dropped a bombshell with no warning: Its customer growth was roughly half what it projected, and Netflix actually lost U.S. subscribers during the period. That hasn’t happened since 2011, when the company made a disastrous attempt to split up its streaming and DVD-by-mail operations.The fallout on Thursday included the worst stock rout in three years, with the stock declining 10% to erase more than $16 billion in market value. Shares in Netflix extended those declines on Friday, falling 3.1% to $315.10 per share, their lowest since January. The stock has fallen for seven consecutive sessions, the longest losing streak in nearly four years.“You would think Netflix would want to update guidance or give a pre-annoucement, as I’m sure they definitely knew about this for a while,” said Nick Licouris, an investment adviser at Gerber Kawasaki. “But they probably didn’t want to do it because they were going to take a hit at that time or during earnings -- especially since subscriber numbers are the No. 1 thing analysts look at -- and in earnings you can spin it better than a stand-alone announcement.”Not Necessary?Another reason not to issue a warning: The company met most of Wall Street’s financial estimates, such as sales and profit. It was only the subscriber numbers that really came up short.“Revenue was very close to guidance and profits were actually above, so I’d guess they didn’t think it was necessary to pre-announce a weak sub number when other financial metrics were fine,” said Andy Hargreaves, an analyst at KeyBanc Capital Markets Inc.There’s also been a broader shift away from giving earnings warnings, said Huber Research Partners founder Craig Huber.“I have noticed companies in media and internet that I follow do not seem to pre-announce pending negative results with the same regularity as years ago,” he said.Netflix, based in Los Gatos, California, didn’t have an immediate comment.The streaming giant’s tight-lipped culture extends beyond earnings. Unlike traditional media companies, it’s very selective about the viewer information it provides. Third parties try to fill the gaps by providing their own data on Netflix’s audience, but that can prove to be unreliable.Third-Party ServicesThose kinds of data services failed to predict the latest shortfall, Wolfe Research analyst Marci Ryvicker said in a note.“For several days,” she said, “investors told us ‘such-and-such data service suggests domestic adds will come in line; while international might be somewhat soft.’ Wrong. I mean -- right in the sense that international was soft but totally wrong on the domestic subs part.”Netflix remains the dominant paid video streaming service, with its sights set on international expansion to counter slowing growth at home. But rising competition abroad -- such as a U.K. streaming venture announced Friday between ITV Plc and the BBC -- couldchallenge that growth as well.Netflix also delivers its earnings in an idiosyncratic way. Instead of doing a traditional Q&A conference call, the company releases an “earnings interview” on YouTube with a single analyst. It also issues its reports on its website, not through the paid services that many companies use to disseminate information.Though this week’s stock rout was especially severe, it’s common for Netflix’s earnings to spark a huge share move. The average change on the day after quarterly reports is almost 13%, according to data compiled by Bloomberg. Compare that with Apple Inc., where it’s 4.4%. Or Microsoft Corp., where it’s 4.1%.There’s another explanation for the huge swings in Netflix’s stock: overreaction. That was themessage from Chief Executive Officer Reed Hastings this week. It’s easy to “overinterpret” subscriber figures, he said.“Sometimes we are forecast high, sometimes we forecast low,” he said. “We’re just executing forward and trying to do the best forecast we can.”(Closes shares in fourth paragraph.)\--With assistance from Morwenna Coniam.To contact the reporters on this story: Kamaron Leach in New York at kleach6@bloomberg.net;Lucas Shaw in Los Angeles at lshaw31@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Nick Turner at nturner7@bloomberg.net, Rob GolumFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.
Netflix’s Tight-Lipped Culture Makes Surprises Hard to Avoid
Pocket-sized shark squirts clouds of light from pocketsA pocket-sized pocket shark found in the Gulf of Mexico has turned out to be a new species. Researchers from around the Gulf and in New York have named the species the American pocket shark, or Mollisquama (mah-lihs-KWAH-muh) mississippiensis (MISS-ih-sip-ee-EHN-sis). It's only the third out of more than 500 known shark species that may squirt luminous liquid, said R. Dean Grubbs, a Florida State University scientist who was not involved in the research.
Pocket-sized shark squirts clouds of light from pockets
A Brief History of Conspiracy Theories About the Moon LandingOK, yeah, the moon is weird, but that doesn't mean the moon landing wasn't real
A Brief History of Conspiracy Theories About the Moon Landing
6 Tips for Drinking Alcohol When You Have Allergies and AnaphylaxisThese tips can help keep you safe while drinking alcohol if you have allergies and anaphylaxis.
6 Tips for Drinking Alcohol When You Have Allergies and Anaphylaxis
EU Assessing Security Risks to 5G That Could Include Huawei(Bloomberg) -- The European Union said it may deem certain 5G suppliers a security risk, noting that Chinese law requires domestic companies to collaborate with intelligence agencies.The EU won’t target China’s Huawei Technologies Co. "from the outset," Security Commissioner Julian King told reporters on Friday. But he noted that Chinese national intelligence law "puts certain quite broad requirements on organizations or citizens to support or cooperate or collaborate with national intelligence work.""It is indeed possible that we reach the conclusion that in some cases, some products, services and suppliers are deemed unsafe," King said.U.S. President Donald Trump has advocated for a global ban on Huawei on security grounds, alarming European telecom operators who rely on the company’s equipment to run networks. Excluding Huawei and ZTE Corp. from the next generation of mobile networks would burden European phone companies with 55 billion euros ($62 billion) in extra costs, and delay 5G roll out, the wireless industry’s main lobby group GSMA said last month."There’s a lot of debate about Huawei," King said. "It’s not because we’re obsessing about China. We’re trying to develop a risk assessment across this market,” and major suppliers will feature in feature in the discussion.While individual European governments are free to block a 5G supplier over security concerns, King said he hoped they’d rely on a risk assessment he’s putting together by Oct. 1, based on information from all EU members.“Huawei welcomes the fact-based approach that the EU plans to take in reviewing the national risk assessments of 5G network infrastructure,” the company said in an emailed statement. “It is nowmore important than ever to develop a common approach to cybersecurity.”The EU is relatively powerless to force its member states to abide by its recommendations, but King said the report should help them "reach a view on whether particular products, services or suppliers are sufficiently safe" as states make decisions on high-speed 5G spectrum auctions and network deployment, he told a Brussels press conference.While outright bans on Huawei appear unlikely in Europe, the region it relies on most for growth outside China, countries such as Germany, France and Britain have signaled more limited restrictions and tighter oversight of their networks. Huawei’s European smartphone sales slumped last month, according to market research firm Kantar, after a U.S. component supply ban on the Chinese manufacturer threatened its access to crucial handset software."It is possible if you decide a particular service or supplier is presenting a risk that you find difficult to mitigate, that you can take a decision that reflects that, you take a decision to exclude the supplier from your market," King said.(Updates with Huawei comments in seventh paragraph.)To contact the reporter on this story: Aoife White in Brussels at awhite62@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Anthony Aarons at aaarons@bloomberg.net, Giles Turner, Molly SchuetzFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.
EU Assessing Security Risks to 5G That Could Include Huawei
5 Foods That Help Psoriatic ArthritisPlus, three meals that can help tamp inflammation from psoriatic arthritis.
5 Foods That Help Psoriatic Arthritis
The Moon Landing: 50 Years Later, Hollywood Remembers That Small Step &The Giant LeapA half a century ago tomorrow, Apollo 11 landed on the Moon with a pledge that they “came in peace for all mankind.” As seemingly all of the human race watched, six hours after the Eagle had landed, Neil Armstrong took that remarkable “one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind” and became […]
The Moon Landing: 50 Years Later, Hollywood Remembers That Small Step &The Giant Leap
On 50th anniversary of Apollo 11 landing, here's why 'moon truthers' still existIt's been 50 years since Apollo 11 landed on the moon — but a small number of people still believe it never happened. Yahoo Lifestyle talks to one of them about why he's so passionate to prove it was a hoax.
On 50th anniversary of Apollo 11 landing, here's why 'moon truthers' still exist
What Doctors Missed by Describing My Endometriosis Pain as 'Normal'A woman explains how she's finding her "new normal" with endometriosis after years of being told her pain was "normal."
What Doctors Missed by Describing My Endometriosis Pain as 'Normal'
'World in my window': Apollo went to Moon so we could see EarthOn their journey to the Moon, the Apollo 11 crew had to rotate their spaceship so that one side didn't "barbecue" in the Sun while the other froze -- meaning they couldn't see their destination until they were almost upon it. "When we rolled out and looked at (the Moon), oh, it was an awesome sphere," the 88-year-old told an audience at the George Washington University Thursday night, ahead of the 50th anniversary of the first Moon landing on July 20.
'World in my window': Apollo went to Moon so we could see Earth

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