cut_t_wires_banner.gif
Google Search
22529355 Visitors
 HOME
 Obituaries 7-19
 Yahoo Comic Strips
 Daily Crossword
 Today's Trivia
 Daily Horoscopes
GAMES
 ARCADE
 Sheepish
 Shootem In
 Master Solitaire
 Trap Shooter
 Crypt Raider
 Pharaoh's Tomb
 HANGAROO
Area Towns
 EMERGENCY #s
 Berryville
 Eureka Springs
 Green Forest
 Holiday Island
Local Schools
 Berryville
 Clear Spring
 Eureka Springs
 Green Forest
Nat/Int News
 Top Stories
 World
 Business
 Sports
 Entertainment
 Health
 Politics
 Technology
 Science
 Opin/Editorial
 Oddly Enough

Newsfeeds

Business
Fri, 19 Jul 2019 16:16
Yahoo News - Latest News &Headlines
Trump takes shots at NASA administrator during photo op celebrating Apollo moon landingDuring an Oval Office photo op to commemorate Apollo 11 astronauts Buzz Aldrin and Michael Collins, President Trump dug at NASA chief Jim Bridenstine.
Trump takes shots at NASA administrator during photo op celebrating Apollo moon landing
Plastic or paper? Trump campaign weighs in on straw debateThe president and his reelection campaign are mocking efforts to replace plastic straws with paper ones and turning that disdain into a fundraising gimmick. The president's 2020 campaign manager, Brad Parscale, tweeted that he was "so over paper straws. Later, Parscale tweeted a link to the campaign's online store, where supporters could buy a pack of 10 recyclable and laser engraved "Trump Straws" for $15.
Plastic or paper? Trump campaign weighs in on straw debate
Iran's Revolutionary Guard forces seize British and Liberian-flagged ships in Strait of HormuzIran's Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps (IRGC) seized two ships in the Strait of Hormuz, Iranian, British, and U.S. officials said Friday.
Iran's Revolutionary Guard forces seize British and Liberian-flagged ships in Strait of Hormuz
Why Spirit Aerosystems Stock Popped 7% TodayA dark cloud for Boeing reveals a silver lining for Spirit.
Why Spirit Aerosystems Stock Popped 7% Today
Oil Jumps as Tanker Seizures Escalate Persian Gulf Tensions(Bloomberg) -- Oil jumped in after-market trading following the Iranian Revolutionary Guard Corp seizing a British oil tanker and a Liberian-flagged ship in the Strait of Hormuz, raising stakes in the critical oil chokepoint.Brent futures rose as much as 1.4% from its settlement, while WTI futures also edged higher after the seizure of the tankers. U.K. Foreign Secretary Jeremy Hunt said Friday that he is “extremely concerned by the seizure of two naval vessels by Iranian authorities in the Strait of Hormuz.” “With all the noise about potential negotiations with Iran, the reality is that geopolitical risk is enormously high in the heart of the oil producing gulf and key transport corridor,” said Joe McGonigle, an energy policy analyst for Hedgeye Risk Management and a former senior official at the U.S. Energy Department. “Iran’s only response to maximum pressure by the U.S. is maximum chaos in the region that tries to win concessions from the U.S. Iran’s seizure of the British tanker is just one example and we think the market should get prepared for more risk ahead.”Despite the escalating conflict in the Middle East, New York futures ended the week 7.6% lower, the biggest weekly loss in nearly two months, amid fears about waning demand. The U.S.-China trade war and expanding American fuel stockpiles have also weighed on prices.“The biggest factor driving oil prices today is the Iran-U.S. tension story,” said Phil Flynn, senior market analyst at Price Futures Group Inc. “The rallies appear to show the conflict in Strait of Hormuz might be more serious and that stakes are raised going into this weekend.”West Texas Intermediate for August delivery traded at $55.76 a barrel at 4:46 p.m. after settling at $55.63 a barrel on the New York Mercantile Exchange.Brent for September settlement traded as high as $63.37 a barrel before trading at $62.87 a barrel. The benchmark closed at $62.47 on the ICE Futures Europe Exchange. See also: U.S. Demands Iran Release Foreign Ship, Crew Seized This WeekAfter the U.K. tanker Stena Impero was escorted into Iranian waters, a second vessel in the area, the Liberian-flagged Mesdar, appeared to turn toward the Iranian coast, according to ship-tracking data. The second tanker has left Iranian waters, according to Fars News. In Washington, U.S. President Donald Trump said he will be “working with the U.K.” on the incident and suggested the latest developments justify his harsher approach toward Tehran. “This only goes to show what I’m saying about Iran: trouble, nothing but trouble.”A spokesman for Iran’s Guardian Council suggested the move against at least one of the ships was in retaliation for the British seizure of a tanker carrying Iranian crude earlier this month.“This is the second time injust over a week the U.K. has been the target of escalatory violence by the Iranian regime,” Garrett Marquis, spokesman for National Security Council at the White House, said in an email. “The U.S. will continue to work with our allies and partners to defend our security and interests against Iran’s malign behavior.”\--With assistance from Sharon Cho, Alex Longley, Kasia Klimasinska, Alex Nussbaum and Stephen Cunningham.To contact the reporter on this story: Harkiran Dhillon in New York at kdhillon18@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: David Marino at dmarino4@bloomberg.net, ;Simon Casey at scasey4@bloomberg.net, Jessica Summers, Carlos CaminadaFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.
Oil Jumps as Tanker Seizures Escalate Persian Gulf Tensions
Spacesuits have been bulky since before Apollo 11. A skintight design may change thatThe iconic, but bulky, spacesuit worn by Neil Armstrong hasn't drastically changed in decades. A skintight design may change that.
Spacesuits have been bulky since before Apollo 11. A skintight design may change that
Reined-in rate-cut expectations, Iran tensions hit S&P 500U.S. stocks pulled further back from their records on Friday to cap the weakest week for the S&P 500 since May. Reined-in expectations for how deeply the Federal Reserve will cut interest rates at its next meeting also weighed on stocks. The S&P 500 fell 18.50 points, or 0.6%, to 2,976.61.
Reined-in rate-cut expectations, Iran tensions hit S&P 500
Deal or No Deal? Pelosi Rejects White House Spending Cuts as Budget Negotiations ContinueHouse Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) and Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin have put a positive spin on negotiations over the two-year budget deal that would raise the debt ceiling, with the speaker earlier this week sketching a timeline in which the agreement was completed this week and voted on next week, just before the House begins its six-week August recess.There are signs, however, that the negotiations still face serious hurdles.Late Thursday, the Trump administration presented Democratic negotiators with a list of spending cuts worth roughly $1.1 trillion, as part of a White House effort to secure $150 billion in savings over 10 years. The list includes: * $516 billion in potential savings from extending 2021 spending levels through 2023. This option is reportedly favored by the Republican Study Committee, a large block of conservatives in the House. * $574 billion in possible cuts spread across 30 different spending areas, with the largest being an administration proposal to overhaul drug pricing for savings of $115 billion. * No cuts to defense spending. * No revenue or tax increases.A Democratic source told Politico that the proposed cuts are not being embraced on their side: “This is the White House’s starting point for negotiations on this aspect. They understand these levels are nonstarters for us. Talks will continue.”About those cuts: The $150 billion in cuts are considerably larger than the $38 billion in net offsets agreed to in the 2018 budget deal, Roll Call’s Jennifer Shutt noted. But that agreement included $103 billion in total offsets, Shutt said, perhaps putting the administration's demand in the ballpark, or at least close to it.CNN’s Phil Mattingly said a more realistic goal for offsets is in the $40 billion to $60 billion range.Budget hawks chime in: The Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget said the 2018 budget deal, which is still in effect, added $420 billion to the debt over 10 years, and if spending continues at those levels, that tally comes to $2 trillion.Marc Goldwein of CRFB backed the White House’s proposed spending cuts. “$150 billion is 0.3 percent of the budget. If Congress cant cut or find revenue to pay for that much, were in big trouble,” he tweeted Friday.Calling for any budget deal to be paid for, CRFB said earlier this week: “President Trump last year said in response to a $1.3 trillion omnibus bill that enacted the last spending increase: ‘I will never sign another bill like this again.’ He should enforce this mantra and insist Congress bring responsible budget process back to our nation’s finances, not more debt binging cloaked as bipartisanship that we can’t afford."A sacred thing? Despite Pelosi’s broad rejection of the White House proposal for spending cuts, President Trump said Friday the negotiations were in “good shape.” Describing the debt ceiling as a “sacred element of our country,” Trump said, “I can’t imagine anybody ever even thinking of using the debt ceiling as a negotiating wedge.”The Mulvaney factor: The proposed cuts reportedly reflect the views of Trump’s acting chief of staff Mick Mulvaney, a fiscal hawk who used the debt ceiling as a political wedge during the Obama administration. The success of the negotiations may depend on how hard Mulvaney pushes his demands for substantial spending cuts."My worry here is if Mulvaney tries to be too hard on the offset side that we wouldn't be able to come to an agreement," Sen. Chuck Schumer (D-NY) told CNN Thursday. "I hope he will let Mnuchin and us come to the agreement and I think we can get it quite soon."What’s next: CNN’s Phil Mattingly captured the tension in the talks Friday: “Negotiators are on the brink of a deal. Now comes the hard part.” A Trump administration official told Bloomberg News that negotiations are expected to continue over the weekend and into next week.Like what you're reading? Sign up for our free newsletter.
Deal or No Deal? Pelosi Rejects White House Spending Cuts as Budget Negotiations Continue
What Investors Should Know About Schaffer Corporation Limited's (ASX:SFC) Financial StrengthSchaffer Corporation Limited (ASX:SFC) is a small-cap stock with a market capitalization of AU$190m. While investors...
What Investors Should Know About Schaffer Corporation Limited's (ASX:SFC) Financial Strength
Trump Win on Health Plans Advances Effort to Undo Obamacare(Bloomberg) -- The Trump administration can expand the sale of short-term health insurance policies that don’t meet the standards of the Affordable Care Act, a federal judge ruled, advancing the government’s efforts to undo Obamacare.U.S. District Judge Richard Leon in Washington rejected challengers’ claims that policies sold under a government regulation that took effect in October 2018 unlawfullyundermine the ACA.“Not only is any potential negative impact” from the rule “minimal, but its benefits are undeniable,” Leon wrote in a 40-page ruling on Friday. He said there’s no evidence the rule “is having or will have the type of impact -- substantial exodus from the individual market exchanges -- that would threaten the ACA’s structural core.”Shares of companies that sell short-term health policies, including Health Insurance Innovations Inc. and eHealth Inc., jumped on news of the decision.One of the plaintiffs, the Association for Community Affiliated Plans, said it plans to appeal the ruling.“We think this is arbitrary and capricious on the part of the administration, and that it does not comply with Congress’s intent in the Affordable Care Act,” said Meg Murray, chief executive officer of ACAP, which represents nonprofit safety-net health plans.Trouble for Republicans?Congress passed the ACA in 2010 to make comprehensive coverage more widely available regardless of a consumer’s pre-existing health conditions. Friday’s ruling allows insurers to offer far cheaper plans to healthy people, freed from those protections and requirements.That could lead to higher premiums for people in ACA-compliant plans by siphoning off healthier consumers from the ACA risk pool over time -- and potentially to a political headache for Republicans on an issue that fueled the Democratic takeover of the House last year.The judge based his ruling partly on the elimination of the individual-mandate tax penalty in the GOP’s 2017 tax law. Some Republican senators have since said they didn’t intend their vote to undermine protections for people with pre-existing conditions.Susan Collins of Maine was the only Republican to vote for a Democratic resolution opposing the short-term plan regulation in October.“It is essential that individuals who suffer from pre-existing conditions are covered,” she said then.Two years after the late Senator John McCain gave the thumbs-down to his Republican colleagues’ effort to repeal the ACA, the court case underscores the quickening tempo of the fight over President Barack Obama’s signature legislative achievement.Health Care DrumbeatIn March, another federal judge in Washington rejected the administration’s attempt to permit small businesses to band together to offer “association health plans” exemptfrom ACA rules, calling it “an end run around the ACA.” The same month, a third judge struck down administration-backed policies in Kentucky and Arkansas that required many people on Medicaid to work in order to maintain their eligibility for the health program for the poor.Meanwhile, a federalappeals court in New Orleans is weighing a request to overrule a Texas judge’s decision late last year to strike down the ACA in its entirety, a move supported by the Justice Department.Those suing to overturn the Trump administration’s short-term health insurance regulation -- among them the American Psychiatric Associaton, AIDS United and the National Partnership for Women and Families -- argued that the rule thwarts Congress’s intent by permitting the plans to last as long as 364 days and to be renewed for three years. The Obama administration had limited them to three months. Leon heard arguments in the case on May 21.The rule could create a longer-lasting alternative to ACA coverage that might lure healthier patients away from Obamacare, undermining the risk pools it depends on in offering its more comprehensive coverage, the plaintiffs argued. An attorney for the administration countered that there was a demand for policies cheaper than Affordable Care Act plans and that their availability hadn’t drawn people away from ACA coverage.Read MoreA Trio of Trump Rules Will Remake Insurance MarketsBlue States Challenge Trump’s Association Plan RulesTrump Tells Court to Scrap Obamacare, Raising 2020 Risks“No legislation pursues its purposes at all costs,” Leon wrote in rejecting the plaintiffs’ arguments. “To be sure, the ACA’s various reforms are interdependent and were designed to work together as features of the individual exchange markets. However, Congress clearly did not intend for the law to apply to all species of individual health insurance.”The initiative to expand short-term coverage arose in 2017 after the Senate failed in its push for ACA repeal. In an executive order, President Donald Trump called for expanding access to short-term coverage, describing those policies as exempt from the ACA’s “onerous and expensive insurance mandates and regulations.”Unlike Obamacare plans, the short-term policies don’t have to cover a standard set of essential benefits, and can be substantially cheaper. They also don’t have to pay out aminimum of 80% of the premiums they collect on medical care, an ACA rule that applies to other health insurance. Companies offering the plans can refuse to insure people with pre-existing medical conditions.Those practices were typical of the individual insurance market in many states before the ACA came along. Obamacare was intended to end them but permitted short-term plans to remain on the market.At the end of 2017, about 122,000 Americans were enrolled in short-term medical plans, according to data from the National Association of Insurance Commissioners. Trump’s policy could dramatically expand the market. Federal actuaries estimate that 600,000 more people might purchase short-term coverage in 2019 because of the rule.House Democrats have derided short-term plans as “junk” insurance. The House Energy and Commerce Committee in March announced an investigation into 12 companies selling short-term policies.The case is Association for Community Affiliated Plans v. U.S. Department of Treasury, 18-cv-2133, U.S. District Court, District of Columbia (Washington).(Updates with comments from plaintiff in sixth paragraph.)\--With assistance from Steven T. Dennis and Cristin Flanagan.To contact the reporters on this story: Andrew Harris in Washington at aharris16@bloomberg.net;John Tozzi in New York at jtozzi2@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: David Glovin at dglovin@bloomberg.net, Peter JeffreyFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.
Trump Win on Health Plans Advances Effort to Undo Obamacare
Bernie Sanders defends staff pay after complaints his campaign isn't paying $15 an hourBernie Sanders defended his campaign’s compensation package after an article highlighted concerns that staffers weren't receiving the $15-an-hour wage he champions.
Bernie Sanders defends staff pay after complaints his campaign isn't paying $15 an hour
Netflix’s Tight-Lipped Culture Makes Surprises Hard to Avoid(Bloomberg) -- Netflix Inc.’s biggest earnings surprise in years sent the shares plummeting the day after results were released, leaving analysts and investors wondering why they were caught so off guard.When some companies know that their quarterly results are going to fall short of forecasts, they put out a pre-announcement or update their guidance. But not Netflix.Instead, the company dropped a bombshell with no warning: Its customer growth was roughly half what it projected, and Netflix actually lost U.S. subscribers during the period. That hasn’t happened since 2011, when the company made a disastrous attempt to split up its streaming and DVD-by-mail operations.The fallout on Thursday included the worst stock rout in three years, with the stock declining 10% to erase more than $16 billion in market value. Shares in Netflix extended those declines on Friday, falling 3.1% to $315.10 per share, their lowest since January. The stock has fallen for seven consecutive sessions, the longest losing streak in nearly four years.“You would think Netflix would want to update guidance or give a pre-annoucement, as I’m sure they definitely knew about this for a while,” said Nick Licouris, an investment adviser at Gerber Kawasaki. “But they probably didn’t want to do it because they were going to take a hit at that time or during earnings -- especially since subscriber numbers are the No. 1 thing analysts look at -- and in earnings you can spin it better than a stand-alone announcement.”Not Necessary?Another reason not to issue a warning: The company met most of Wall Street’s financial estimates, such as sales and profit. It was only the subscriber numbers that really came up short.“Revenue was very close to guidance and profits were actually above, so I’d guess they didn’t think it was necessary to pre-announce a weak sub number when other financial metrics were fine,” said Andy Hargreaves, an analyst at KeyBanc Capital Markets Inc.There’s also been a broader shift away from giving earnings warnings, said Huber Research Partners founder Craig Huber.“I have noticed companies in media and internet that I follow do not seem to pre-announce pending negative results with the same regularity as years ago,” he said.Netflix, based in Los Gatos, California, didn’t have an immediate comment.The streaming giant’s tight-lipped culture extends beyond earnings. Unlike traditional media companies, it’s very selective about the viewer information it provides. Third parties try to fill the gaps by providing their own data on Netflix’s audience, but that can prove to be unreliable.Third-Party ServicesThose kinds of data services failed to predict the latest shortfall, Wolfe Research analyst Marci Ryvicker said in a note.“For several days,” she said, “investors told us ‘such-and-such data service suggests domestic adds will come in line; while international might be somewhat soft.’ Wrong. I mean -- right in the sense that international was soft but totally wrong on the domestic subs part.”Netflix remains the dominant paid video streaming service, with its sights set on international expansion to counter slowing growth at home. But rising competition abroad -- such as a U.K. streaming venture announced Friday between ITV Plc and the BBC -- couldchallenge that growth as well.Netflix also delivers its earnings in an idiosyncratic way. Instead of doing a traditional Q&A conference call, the company releases an “earnings interview” on YouTube with a single analyst. It also issues its reports on its website, not through the paid services that many companies use to disseminate information.Though this week’s stock rout was especially severe, it’s common for Netflix’s earnings to spark a huge share move. The average change on the day after quarterly reports is almost 13%, according to data compiled by Bloomberg. Compare that with Apple Inc., where it’s 4.4%. Or Microsoft Corp., where it’s 4.1%.There’s another explanation for the huge swings in Netflix’s stock: overreaction. That was themessage from Chief Executive Officer Reed Hastings this week. It’s easy to “overinterpret” subscriber figures, he said.“Sometimes we are forecast high, sometimes we forecast low,” he said. “We’re just executing forward and trying to do the best forecast we can.”(Closes shares in fourth paragraph.)\--With assistance from Morwenna Coniam.To contact the reporters on this story: Kamaron Leach in New York at kleach6@bloomberg.net;Lucas Shaw in Los Angeles at lshaw31@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Nick Turner at nturner7@bloomberg.net, Rob GolumFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.
Netflix’s Tight-Lipped Culture Makes Surprises Hard to Avoid
Netflix’s Tight-Lipped Culture Makes Surprises Hard to Avoid(Bloomberg) -- Netflix Inc.’s biggest earnings surprise in years sent the shares plummeting the day after results were released, leaving analysts and investors wondering why they were caught so off guard.When some companies know that their quarterly results are going to fall short of forecasts, they put out a pre-announcement or update their guidance. But not Netflix.Instead, the company dropped a bombshell with no warning: Its customer growth was roughly half what it projected, and Netflix actually lost U.S. subscribers during the period. That hasn’t happened since 2011, when the company made a disastrous attempt to split up its streaming and DVD-by-mail operations.The fallout on Thursday included the worst stock rout in three years, with the stock declining 10% to erase more than $16 billion in market value. Shares in Netflix extended those declines on Friday, falling 3.1% to $315.10 per share, their lowest since January. The stock has fallen for seven consecutive sessions, the longest losing streak in nearly four years.“You would think Netflix would want to update guidance or give a pre-annoucement, as I’m sure they definitely knew about this for a while,” said Nick Licouris, an investment adviser at Gerber Kawasaki. “But they probably didn’t want to do it because they were going to take a hit at that time or during earnings -- especially since subscriber numbers are the No. 1 thing analysts look at -- and in earnings you can spin it better than a stand-alone announcement.”Not Necessary?Another reason not to issue a warning: The company met most of Wall Street’s financial estimates, such as sales and profit. It was only the subscriber numbers that really came up short.“Revenue was very close to guidance and profits were actually above, so I’d guess they didn’t think it was necessary to pre-announce a weak sub number when other financial metrics were fine,” said Andy Hargreaves, an analyst at KeyBanc Capital Markets Inc.There’s also been a broader shift away from giving earnings warnings, said Huber Research Partners founder Craig Huber.“I have noticed companies in media and internet that I follow do not seem to pre-announce pending negative results with the same regularity as years ago,” he said.Netflix, based in Los Gatos, California, didn’t have an immediate comment.The streaming giant’s tight-lipped culture extends beyond earnings. Unlike traditional media companies, it’s very selective about the viewer information it provides. Third parties try to fill the gaps by providing their own data on Netflix’s audience, but that can prove to be unreliable.Third-Party ServicesThose kinds of data services failed to predict the latest shortfall, Wolfe Research analyst Marci Ryvicker said in a note.“For several days,” she said, “investors told us ‘such-and-such data service suggests domestic adds will come in line; while international might be somewhat soft.’ Wrong. I mean -- right in the sense that international was soft but totally wrong on the domestic subs part.”Netflix remains the dominant paid video streaming service, with its sights set on international expansion to counter slowing growth at home. But rising competition abroad -- such as a U.K. streaming venture announced Friday between ITV Plc and the BBC -- couldchallenge that growth as well.Netflix also delivers its earnings in an idiosyncratic way. Instead of doing a traditional Q&A conference call, the company releases an “earnings interview” on YouTube with a single analyst. It also issues its reports on its website, not through the paid services that many companies use to disseminate information.Though this week’s stock rout was especially severe, it’s common for Netflix’s earnings to spark a huge share move. The average change on the day after quarterly reports is almost 13%, according to data compiled by Bloomberg. Compare that with Apple Inc., where it’s 4.4%. Or Microsoft Corp., where it’s 4.1%.There’s another explanation for the huge swings in Netflix’s stock: overreaction. That was themessage from Chief Executive Officer Reed Hastings this week. It’s easy to “overinterpret” subscriber figures, he said.“Sometimes we are forecast high, sometimes we forecast low,” he said. “We’re just executing forward and trying to do the best forecast we can.”(Closes shares in fourth paragraph.)\--With assistance from Morwenna Coniam.To contact the reporters on this story: Kamaron Leach in New York at kleach6@bloomberg.net;Lucas Shaw in Los Angeles at lshaw31@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Nick Turner at nturner7@bloomberg.net, Rob GolumFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.
Netflix’s Tight-Lipped Culture Makes Surprises Hard to Avoid
Fed's Rosengren defends central bank independenceBoston Fed President Eric Rosengren on Friday made a case for keeping the central bank's actions independent from politicians. "It is important that central banks have flexibility to adjust their tactics to a changing economic environment," Rosengren said in remarks prepared for delivery at an academic conference in New York. "It is quite possible that the mandated goals of the central bank – which centre on attaining medium-run economic prosperity – can differ substantially from the understandably shorter-term pressures facing elected officials.
Fed's Rosengren defends central bank independence
Why J.C. Penney, QEP Resources, and Pacific Biosciences Slumped TodayBad news on several different fronts held these stocks back.
Why J.C. Penney, QEP Resources, and Pacific Biosciences Slumped Today

 INSURANCE
Browser Prefs
Add to Favorites
Make Home Page
Arcade Hi Scores
Snake:
15000
By: I DID NOT CHEAT
Tetris:
2147483647
By: PLAYED BY MASTER
Asteroids:
2147483647
By: WORLD RECORD
Invaders:
2147483647
By: YOU DID HACK IT
Pacman:
200000
By: GAME OVER
ABC News
 World News
 U.S. News
 Politics
 MONEYScope
 SciTech
 Entertainment
 Travel
 Health
 Relationships
 GMA
 Nightline
 Primetime
 20/20
 WNT

NWADN.com disclaims all liability or responsibility for any loss or damage that may result from the action or
failure to act or not act by any person in regards to any information provided within this website.